GALLERY

Welcome to our colourful gallery which currently features work by: Thomas Seccombe, H.M. Bateman, George Finch Mason, Richard Simkin & W.A. Gardiner.
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T.S Seccombe (1840 – 1899) 

Seccombe had a successful career in London as an artist and illustrator after his retirement from  the Royal Artillery. Much of his work brings to life the military and social perils of life in the Victorian army.  These cartoons from his book ‘Military Misreadings of Shakspere’ are cleverly matched  with  quotations he chose from Shakespeare’s plays. The separate figures are digitally cut-out from the cartoons. 

Available as: GICLEE PRINTS, GREETINGS CARDS, JIGSAW PUZZLES, TABLE MATS, MUGS, COASTERS

 
Plate 101 - The Levee

Plate 101 - The Levee

“This jarring discord of Nobility, this should’ring of each other in the court.” HENRY VI., PART I. — ACT IV., SCENE 1.

Plate102 - In the line of duty

Plate102 - In the line of duty

“How I am brav’d, and must perforce endure it.” HENRY VI., PART I. - ACT II., SCENE 4.

Plate 103 - Leg up

Plate 103 - Leg up

“I cannot reach so high.” TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA., - ACT I., SCENE 2.

Plate 104 - Artillery practice on the range

Plate 104 - Artillery practice on the range

“And, after this; and then to breakfast with what appetite you have.” HENRY VIII., - ACT III., SCENE 2.

Plate 105 - Sporting chance

Plate 105 - Sporting chance

“I do perceive here a divided duty.” OTHELLO., - ACT I., SCENE 3 ...

Plate 106 - Follow my leader

Plate 106 - Follow my leader

“That what you cannot, as you would, achieve, you must perforce accomplish as you may.” TITUS ANDRONICUS. -ACT II., SCENE 1.

Plate 107 - Domestic duty

Plate 107 - Domestic duty

“In peace, was never gentle lamb more mild.” RICHARD II. - ACT II., SCENE 1.

Plate 108 - Extension motions

Plate 108 - Extension motions

“I do not strain at the position, it is familiar.” TROILUS AND CRESSIDA. - ACT III., SCENE 3.

Plate 109 - Hot pursuit

Plate 109 - Hot pursuit

“For fly he could not, if he would have fled.” HENRY VI., PART I. - ACT IV., SCENE 4.

Plate 110 - Flight of fancy

Plate 110 - Flight of fancy

“What power is it, which mounts my love so high?” ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL. — ACT I., SCENE 1.

Plate 111 - Trip hazard

Plate 111 - Trip hazard

“I do not without danger walk these streets.” TWELFTH NIGHT., - ACT III., SCENE 3. ...

Plate 112 - Toothache

Plate 112 - Toothache

“He that commends me to mine own content, commends me to the thing I cannot get.” COMEDY OF ERRORS. - ACT I., SCENE 2.

Plate 113 - Officers' Equitation

Plate 113 - Officers' Equitation

“Prepared I was not for such a business; therefore am I found so much unsettled.” ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL. - ACT II., SCENE 5.

Plate 114 - Sharp Practice

Plate 114 - Sharp Practice

“Our Captain hath in every figure skill.” TIMON OF ATHENS. — ACT V., SCENE 4.

Plate 115 - Trot Past

Plate 115 - Trot Past

“My Lord, I scarce have leisure to salute you.” TROILUS AND CRESSIDA. — ACT IV., SCENE 2.

Plate 116 - An Unpromising Start

Plate 116 - An Unpromising Start

“I looked upon her with a soldier’s eye, that liked, but had a rougher task in hand.” MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING. - ACT I., SCENE 1.

Plate 117 - Fencibles

Plate 117 - Fencibles

“Where every horse bears his commanding rein, and may direct his course as please himself.” RICHARD III. — ACT II., SCENE 2.

Plate 118 - Musical Discord

Plate 118 - Musical Discord

“His liberty is full of threats to all.” HAMLET. — ACT IV., SCENE 1. ...

Plate 119 - The Kiddies

Plate 119 - The Kiddies

“I would, I had thy inches.” CLEOPATRA., — ACT I., SCENE 3.

Plate 120 - Force Majeure

Plate 120 - Force Majeure

“Blame not this haste of mine.” TWELFTH NIGHT. — ACT IV., SCENE 3.

Plate 121 - Thin Red Line

Plate 121 - Thin Red Line

“Oh, Hamlet, what a falling off was there;” HAMLET. - ACT I., SCENE 5.

Plate 122 - Prickly Business

Plate 122 - Prickly Business

“And my appointments have in them in a need, greater than shows itself at the first view, to you that know them not.” ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL.- ACT II., SCENE 5.

Plate 123 - Autumn Manoeuvres

Plate 123 - Autumn Manoeuvres

“Content you, gentlemen; I’ll compound this strife.” TAMING OF THE SHREW. - ACT II., SCENE 1.

Plate 124 - Critical Interview

Plate 124 - Critical Interview

“Thou art a soldier, therefore seldom rich.” TIMON OF ATHENS.- ACT I., SCENE 2.

Plate 125 - Spirited Affair

Plate 125 - Spirited Affair

“My spirit can no longer bear these harms.” HENRY VI., PART I. - ACT IV., SCENE 7.

Plate 126 - Clothing Inspection

Plate 126 - Clothing Inspection

“Your several suits have been considered and debated on.” HENRY VI., PART I. - ACT V., SCENE 1.

Plate 127 - Puzzled

Plate 127 - Puzzled

“If I know how, or which way, to order these affairs, thus thrust disorderly into my hands, never believe me.” RICHARD II. - ACT II., SCENE 2.

Plate 128 - In the Line of Fire

Plate 128 - In the Line of Fire

“But this is mere digression from my purpose.” HENRY IV., PART II. - ACT IV., SCENE 1. ...

Plate 129 - Staff Work

Plate 129 - Staff Work

“But this exceeding posting, day and night, must wear your spirits low.” ALL’S WELL THAT ENDS WELL. - ACT V., SCENE 1.

Plate 130 - Troublesome Gust

Plate 130 - Troublesome Gust

“And I myself know well, how troublesome it sat upon my head.” HENRY IV., PART II. - ACT IV., SCENE 4.

Plate 131 - Annual Inspection

Plate 131 - Annual Inspection

“Alas, how fiery and how sharp he looks!” COMEDY OF ERRORS. - ACT IV., SCENE 4.

Plate 132 - Rumbled

Plate 132 - Rumbled

“And hark, what noise the general makes!” CORIOLANUS.- ACT I., SCENE 5.

Plate 150 - Gentleman at Arms

Plate 150 - Gentleman at Arms

Cut-out

Plate 151 - Life Guard

Plate 151 - Life Guard

Cut-out

Plate 152 - Dragoon Guard

Plate 152 - Dragoon Guard

Cut-out

Plate 153 - Lancer

Plate 153 - Lancer

Cut-out

Plate 154 - Hussar

Plate 154 - Hussar

Cut-out

Plate 155 - Riding Master

Plate 155 - Riding Master

Cut-out

Plate 156 - Ensign

Plate 156 - Ensign

Cut-out

Plate 157 - Guardsman

Plate 157 - Guardsman

Cut-out

Plate 158 - Line Officer

Plate 158 - Line Officer

Cut-out

Plate 159 - Fusilier

Plate 159 - Fusilier

Cut-out

Plate 161 - Highlander

Plate 161 - Highlander

Cut-out

Plate 160 - General

Plate 160 - General

Cut-out

 
HM Bateman (1887 – 1970)

H. M. Bateman was the finest cartoonist of his time; he had a unique eye for the ridiculous and a special skill in emphasising the discomfort of his subjects. He was best known for his series ‘The Man who…..’.  We include two figures from his popular book ’Colonels’ which have been named for Mess Art by his granddaughter.

Available as: GICLEE PRINTS, GREETINGS CARDS, JIGSAW PUZZLES, MUGS, COASTERS

 

Our range of Bateman cartoons is subject to copyright: © H M Bateman Designs    www.hmbateman.com

Watermarks do not appear on any products.

Very well meant.(Plate 201)

The umpire who confessed he wasn’t looking! (Plate 202)

The Second Lieutenant who took the CO’s savoury. (Plate 203)

The man who missed the ball on the first tee at St Andrew’s. (Plate 204)

The man who lit his cigar before the Royal toast. (Plate 205)

The man who crept into the royal enclosure in a bowler. (Plate 206)

The man who asked for a second helping at a city company dinner. (Plate 207)

The Lifeguardsman who dropped it. (Plate 208)

The Guardsman who dropped it. A tragedy at Wellington barracks! (Plate 209)

The guards bathe. (Plate 210)

The game that wouldn’t play the game. (Plate 211)

The car that touched a policeman. (Plate 212)

Cowes nightmare - unwelcome guest. (Plate 213)

Plate 251 - Suspicion

Plate 251 - Suspicion

Plate 252 - Curiosity

Plate 252 - Curiosity

Our range of Bateman cartoons is subject to copyright: © H M Bateman Designs www.hmbateman.com

 
George Finch Mason (1850 – 1915)

A sporting and military artist and illustrator well known for his humorous work. These four cartoons were published by Fores, 41 Piccadilly, London in the early 20th Century as part of  ‘Finch Mason’s Sporting Sketches’; it is thought unlikely that Season’s Greetings was published.

Available as: GICLEE PRINTS,  GREETINGS CARDS, JIGSAW PUZZLES, TABLE MATS, MUGS, COASTERS

Plate 301 - Hot Work

Plate 301 - Hot Work

Hot work for Mr Nubbles

Plate 302 - Woodcock Day

Plate 302 - Woodcock Day

A good day for woodcock

Plate 303 - Percy Popjoy

Plate 303 - Percy Popjoy

Warm day for Percy Popjoy

Plate 304 - Ruddy Fox

Plate 304 - Ruddy Fox

The ruddy fox hisself

Plate 305 - Season's Greetings

Plate 305 - Season's Greetings

Compliments of the Season Small Print (image: 158mm x 232mm) (mount: 322mm x 420mm)

Plate 350 - Woodcock

Plate 350 - Woodcock

Cut-out ...

Plate 351 - Keeper

Plate 351 - Keeper

Cut-out

Plate 352 - Percy Popjoy

Plate 352 - Percy Popjoy

Cut-out

Plate 353 - Ruddy Fox

Plate 353 - Ruddy Fox

Cut-out

 
Richard Simkin (1850 – 1926)

Thought to have joined a volunteer regiment before attending art school Simkin emerged as a military artist in the early 1880s. One of the most prolific and best known watercolourists of British Army uniforms he created work for regiments, illustrated books, periodicals and recruiting posters for the War Office.  

Available as: GICLEE PRINTS, GREETINGS CARDS, MUGS, COASTERS

Plate 401- Botheration

Plate 401- Botheration

Plate 402 - Presentation

Plate 402 - Presentation

Plate 403 - D-nation

Plate 403 - D-nation

Plate 404 - Gratification

Plate 404 - Gratification

Plate 450 - Botheration

Plate 450 - Botheration

Cut-out

Plate 451 - Presentation

Plate 451 - Presentation

Cut-out

Plate 452 - D-nation

Plate 452 - D-nation

Cut-out

Plate 453 - Gratification

Plate 453 - Gratification

Cut-out

Other Artists
 
Plate 501 - Boys at Play - W.A Gardiner

Plate 501 - Boys at Play - W.A Gardiner

Small Print (image: 190mm x 174mm) (mount: 355mm x 362mm)

W A Gardiner (1766-1814)

An Irish engraver whose work was well regarded by London publishers. A restless man  known for his eccentricity, he returned to his native Dublin around 1800 and committed suicide in 1814. This light-hearted engraving symbolises a soldier’s off-duty activities or were there two?